Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
The Healing American Healthcare Podcast
The Healing American Healthcare Podcast

Episode 2 · 2 years ago

COVID-19 Mitigation & The New Normal

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Health Affairs released a research article developed by Yale and Harvard on how the implementation of a new COVID vaccine would contribute more to its success than the vaccine’s actual efficacy. Also, USA Today and The New York Times have released articles on how other countries have altered their lifestyles to successfully mitigate the pandemic. 

Hello and welcome to the healing American healthcare podcast. Today I'm at Ikorn, the founder of the healing American Healthcare Coalition, and today we have the editor of the three minute read, John Dalton, with us to share some articles that we published over the last week. Good Morning John, Good Morning Head, nice to be with you today well, thanks for joining me. Our last issue went out last week to our subscriber list and taking five illuminating articles on fortune. Most of them are occupied with the COVID nineteen pandemic. One of them, an article wristing fellows in health affairs, provides a whoy different perspective on the Covid nineteen vaccine that's now emerging. Would you like to discuss that with our readers? Sure. The article is called clinical outcomes of a covid nineteen vaccine implementation over efficacy, and it was research article that was developed by researchers from Yale and Harvard, where they examined vaccine efficacy with variables of...

...how the vaccine would be implemented, its effectiveness and the background epidemic severity of the area in which this vaccine would be introduced, and they reviewed these outcomes with respect to total infections, hospitalizations and deaths using a mathematical simulation model, and they found that factors relating to implementation will con tribute more to the success of the vaccine then the vaccines actual efficacy as determined in clinical trials. They learned that the benefits of a vaccine will decline if manufacturing or deployment delays occur and the public still has significant concerns about actually getting vaccinated, or if the greater epidemic severity really develops and the infection rate goes up. They found there is an urgent need for health officials to continue and expand efforts to promote public...

...confidence in the vaccines that have been developed, and they need to encourage additional adherence to the mitigation approaches that have been suggested from the very beginning of the pandemic, which include wearing a mask, social distancing, staying away from crowds, of course, and washing our hands frequently. When the leader of the study, Dr Palliatel from Yale, was interviewed by The New York Times, he made the important point saying vaccines don't save lives, vaccination programs save lives. His study team concluded that to reduce the pandemics infections, hospitalizations and deaths. A successful vaccine rolette was just as important as the vaccines efficacy. He is concerned that the US is not done enough to prepare for successful distribution of a vaccine in the months to come after one of the vaccines or several of the vaccines are approved for use by the FDA. Yeah, I thought that was a fascinating study. It makes it very abundantly clear that mitigation recommendations such...

...as wearing masks and public avoiding crowds and watching hands frequently are just as important as a successful roll out of the approve vaccines. Also, what's needed as a public commitment to getting vaccinated if we're going to control covid nineteen of interest, though, when our last issue one out, I did get feedback from a cousin of mine who lives in the suburb outside St Louis. She and her husband are about our age, Nice, stated community and their next door neighbors are covid NIERS. She emailed me back to let me know that the Anglo said showed up last Saturday for him next door neighbor of the husband, to take him to the hospital. These seventy five old beast and with an underlying heart condition, where he was going to join his wife was already hospitalized. So these this is a couple who are making fun of my cousin and their husband for wearing masks in public. Apparently they and twenty of their like minded friends have had a halloween. Forty nine of them currently have covid. So Dr Pal feel's advices was clear. Vaccines don't save lives. Of vaccination...

...programs save lives. So between the COVID and Ires and the empty vaxers, there's quite a challenge ahead for getting covid nineteen hundred control in America. Well, just this morning actually, it was announced on one of the TV and news channels that all of the past presidents of the United States are going to be a part of a public outreach effort when a vaccine is approved. They were all get vaccinated on TV to promote getting vaccinated. Studies today reports that approximately fifty percent of Americans are afraid of actually having this vaccine. And in order to get to hurt immunity, we need to get approximately seventy five percent of Americans to have one of the vaccines that should be approved during the next month or so. The outreach is extremely important and continuing mitigation strategies to lower the infection rate will also have an important effect on our ability to defeat the virus in our country. That leads me to ask you about two other articles that were a part of our last newsletter. John, if you could give...

...us some information about how some other countries are actually a dealing with the virus and controlling the infection, I think that would support the point made in the health affairs article. Thanks that. Yet the three months ahead and look to be very challenging, but there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Talking in another podcast about vaccine development grow out, but given the latest guidelines, here's that by January, February without a significant portion of the population, partically the most valuable in the front line healthcare workers, vaccinated. So experts of cautiously optimistic that by late April, early maybe we actually experiencing something. They can to a new normal, and the other two articles kind of took a look at what might the new normal look like. First was intitled no locklands, no down turn. Taiwan attracts skilled expats with mostly cold free life and appeared USA Today on November twenty. onest. Taiwan is a bustling technology home. It's home to about twenty four million people off the coast of...

China. It's attracting a growing community of expatriates due to its success in controlling the coronavirus. There are been no lockdowns or curbs on economic activity, but masks and fever checks are ubiquitous. It's roughly the same population as Florida. Taiwan has had a total of six hundred and seven confirmed cases and seven deaths, compared with Floridas more than eight hundred ninety seven thousand cases and seventeen thousand six hundred deaths. So more than eight hundred and twenty entrepreneur residency permits have been approved this year, up from three hundred and fifty eight in two thousand and nineteen. So that's well more than double wherever. Settling in Taiwan does have some down side. It's densely populated, so if you're living in apartment building, you hear your neighbor upstairs padding before and it's English fluency lacks both Hong Kong and Singapore. The other article appeared in The New York Times headline.

I am living in a covid free world, just a few hundred miles from Manhattan and spy Stephanie Nolan. It appeared November eighteen. Stephanie Nolan's a freelance a journalist who works out at the gym, sends her children to school and gathers friends with dinner without restrictions. In Virus Free Nova Scotia are the Canadian maritime provinces. A March lockdown included closing provincial borders and even hiking trails. It worked and restrictions gradually were lifted in June. The pandemic has changed the way people live so so distancing and mask wearing in public are universal. Ask the reasons of the province of success in controlling the virus. Public Health Minister Robert Strang attributed it to public health officials, not politicians, setting policy. Quote. The message has been that we need to do it to keep each other safe. People accept that and quote. Heavily depended on tourism,...

Nova Scotia's economy has recovered only eighty percent of the jobs lost in April. Businesses have closed and eviction rates are climbing. So that, apparently, is the new normal in Nova Scotia. Well, I think these two articles pointing out the importance of mitigation strategies and applying them early enough to affect community spread. In our country we keep passing new thresholds. We will pass fourteen million people infected by the virus over the next day or two. We've had more than a million infected during November and the CDC recently projected that, because of the spikes in the infection rate expected because of the Hanaka and Christmas holidays, we can have four hundred and fifty thousand deaths by the end of February. So it's extremely important that we all honker down a little bit in the United States to see if we can duplicate the results that were achieved in Canada in the Nova Scotia and also the results that have been achieved in places like Taiwan,...

New Zealand, the Philippines and parts of Australia. Hopefully, as people read these articles and learn more about a successful mitigation around the United States, in certain areas, like in some of the school districts and in places like New York that was the early epicenter for the United States, have learned to mitigate better than other areas the country. We can follow those examples to bring down the infection rate and make it easier for viruses to be controlled by a vaccine that, hopefully, more than fifty percent of us will actually receive over the next three to six months. So, John, is there anything else you like to touch on while we're here today? I think that covers enough brown for this podcast. Well. I just like to encourage our listeners to visit the healing American healthcare website at healing American healthcare dot Org and learn how you can receive the three minute read every couple of weeks to be updated on the research and the news that affects all of us with respect to healthcare today...

...and in the future. Thanks again and we'll see you the next time.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (23)